This is not the same blah blah blah interview.

I had this beautiful interview with Neon Order and there are lots of things which I never said before!

1. When and why did you start playing?
I started to play when I was still a child. My parents had a Phil Collins vinyl and I fell in love with “In the air tonight”, that drum fill of course, so I stole my mother’s wood spoons and played them on our straw chairs, until I broke them.

2. Which instruments do you play?
I can play guitars, piano, a little bit bass and drums. I’d love to improve with drums, I love them so much.

3. What was the first tune(s) you learned?
Well, “In the air tonight” on drums! I perfectly remember I learned Eric Clapton’s “Cocaine” on guitar as my first tune, but I can’t remember on piano.

4. Is your family musical?
Well, yes, it is.

5. Describe your family member’s musical interests and abilities.
My mother loves to sing and sometimes she goes with her musician friends to play in some pubs. They play acoustic jazz covers.
My brother plays electronic music, from trap to house, techno, nu disco. He’s really good with production.

6. Which famous musicians do you admire? Why?
I admire and love everything what belongs to my childhood: Phil Collins, Michael Jackson, Italo Disco, Tears for fears. They’re like a part of me.

7. Which famous musicians have you learned from?
I’ve learned a lot of from The Cure and Ludovico Einaudi. Strange to say them together ’cause they’re totally different, but they’re definitely my “teachers”.

8. Who was your first teacher? Other teachers?
I had a piano teacher on music school and she was a milf. Yeah.

9. Describe your first instrument. Other instruments.
Are the wood spoons an instrument? If not, my first one was a cute Casio keyboard (can’t remember the model, something similar to a Casio CT-680) where I learned to move my little fingers. I still have it in my mother’s flat.

10. What are your fondest musical memories? In your house? In your neighborhood or town?
Sure my first band where I played in my teenage. We played some Green Day, Oasis, Rem, Blur. It was my first experience to play with someone and it was just a hobby, we never performed live and never wanted, but it was a wonderful way to learn and spend time with company who shares a common passion.

11. Were you influenced by old records & tapes? Which ones?
Definitely all the tapes from my parents but especially all the 80s hits collection from my father. He had those compilations to listen to them in his car and I couldn’t wait to grow, to get my driving licence and driving by night!

12. Who are your favorite musicians? Groups? CD’s?
I don’t have my all-time favourite, just because I think music is the soundtrack of our life, so every moment must have its best music. 80s music is strong in my music background but I loved bands like Explosions in the sky, Dark Tranquillity, Death, The Cure and Ludovico Einaudi (in random order).

13. Have you been in competitions? Fleadh’s? Any prizes?
Yeah, I’ve been in a competition with my ex metal band. We played in a Transylvania Horror Rock Cafè in middle Italy (Civitanova Marche). I don’t remember very good, so probably we didn’t pass it haha!

14. Do you perform in public? Describe those occasions? Concerts, radio, TV?
I performed in different bands many times in public, most of all with metal bands, with my guitar. One of my favourite live was in Calabria, Southern Italy on a beach just few meters near sea. It was a metal festival, we were dressed in black with our face painted in white under the hot August sun. Woooh.

15. Do you play for dances? Step-dancers? Describe the differences.
I want my music be various. I love the Italo Disco and I have lots of songs inspired by that style, but I also made lots of tracks for workout, or “romantic moments”. Well, that’s a kind of dance too.

16. How do you handle mistakes during a performance?
I don’t make mistakes because my tracks have the same chords and melodies.
Ah, no, maybe 1 or 2 have different chords. But I never play them live.

17. Do you get nervous before a performance or a competition?
Yeah. And I love it.

18. What advice would you give to beginners who are nervous?
A glass of beer could help. If not, two glasses should. Ad libitum.

19. Do you attend sessions? What makes a good session?
Well, first is the music you play, second is how you communicate with your public, third is how you play.

20. How often and for how long do you practice?
I play almost every day for hours, maybe 4-5, depending on my other commitments, but I play only on keys. It’s sad I’m not that good anymore on guitars, there’s lot of rust on my fingers now, because I’m focusing especially on the electronic compositions.

21. What do you practice – exercises, new tunes, hard tunes, etc.?
The best thing for practice is to play on other artists’ tunes. No tabs, everything by ear and harder and harder. This is how I try to improve.

22. Do you teach music?
Yes, to my dog G. She’s a horror composer and she’s already good.

22. How do you balance your music with other obligations – mate, children, job?
Well, I can invert the question. Sometimes while I’m playing I can find some time for other obligations.

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Many secrets unveiled in this interview for Sir K Magazine

My wife Powder Slut and I had a funny talking at our home with a friend from Sir K Magazine. We tell about our private life, music and project. You can also read it here on the free PDF version of the magazine.

Hello Yana and Vincenzo and thank you for allowing us into your house and answering our questions!
Y: It’s a pleasure, we’re always happy to have friends here!
Let’s start from the very beginning. You are an unusual couple. How did you meet?
Y: May I start? Then Vincenzo will tell you his version, if he disagrees.
The beginning of our story started right at the beginning of my music career, when I discovered my passion for synthwave music and I started to listen to a lot of retrowave music, original 80s music, something like glam rock, soundtracks, porn music from the
80s… at a certain point I felt like my library was finished, so I decided to look around and listen to new artists. I didn’t know Vincenzo Salvia. I knew he was Italian and I pictured him as an old guy, because, you know, his music sounded like something great
produced by some famous artist. It sounded original, analog.
How long ago was it?
Y: It was maybe three years ago. Four, actually. To be honest I didn’t really like his music, it was too fun for me, but anyway… I started to play music, I started to compose
and learn how to do it. Doing so, I also moved towards the synthwave scene, chatting on socials with other composers. People started to add me on Facebook and I don’t
know how Vincenzo ended up in my friend list. I probably asked him for his friendship (you know, just to have a good quantity of friends), but he never talked to me, so I
removed him. He was annoying, always promoting some new tracks.
I thought,“I don’t want you here”. Then, on the 18th August something very funny happened. I published a photo in which I was half naked (I used to like modelling very much). A common friend of Vincenzo and I commented on my photo, which therefore appeared on Vincenzo’s timeline.
V: And so I also commented with some jokes about the photo. She was eating a biscuit in a sexy position, showing a bit of breast… But she answered.
Y: I said, “If you guys are so cool, try to repeat my pose” and they did! Vincenzo was the first. He did a parody of my photo, in the bath with biscuits on his body, which was not a perfect figure… V: I used Macine, Italian great biscuits, but I was still thin back then.
Y: We started to chat step by step. I think it was destiny, because for me it was like lightning. I immediately understood that there was something special. I thought, “OMG, he will be my husband”. The first time we spoke on Skype he was on his knees with flowers in his hands, telling me that he loved me.
V: The first time we chatted we both felt something powerful between us.
It was sudden and confusing. After that day we started to go to sleep together, with our webcams on, like we were in the same room.

Like in movies?
Y: I swear! It was the two of us and G, my pechinese dog.
V: Exactly, I remember waking up during the night and thinking, “Oh God, Yana snores quite a lot”, but it was G! So we can say it was an unpredictable beginning for you.
V: When she first added me on Facebook I thought it was a fake profile. That’s why I never spoke to her. I didn’t know about her music, but she had a lot of professional
photos and so I thought it was one of those fake profiles with stolen photos you can find on social networks.
How did you meet, in person?
V: In a short time we decided to meet. I went to Ukraine in December.
Y: He was so little, so cute with his luggage! I met him at the airport and knew he had to be mine.
V: Even though we had never met before, everything was so simple and normal, like we had known each other for ages. I was fascinated by her life and it was beautiful for
me to be able to witness it. It was such a different culture compared to the Italian one.
Y: If you think about it, we took a very big risk, because we met online. The chances to be unhappy and disappointed were very high, but you know, we went through
bad moments because of our differences, but we are here! I think it’s thanks to our common passion, which puts together the pieces and makes everything work.
Music.
Y: Yes. If I was only a designer and not a musician like he is, I wouldn’t be able to understand him and vice-versa. Our music is a little bit different, but we’re on the same line, same references, same lifestyle. I‘ve always wanted a musician as my partner.
V: We share the same sensitivity.
Y: But I’m fire and he’s water. We cause the same reaction when we fight. He’s my water, he always tries to calm me down and I’m his fire. I always try to kick him and poke him. Anyway: on the 18th December he proposed to me. That was very quick! How did he do it?
Y: It was unbelievable. He came to Kiev without even knowing me for real. I could have been a prostitute, who knew… But he came with a ring in his pocket. He bought a ring
before meeting me in person. Of course I said a big YES!
V: In May we got married. It was a small, intimate ceremony.
In Italy?
V: Not in Italy, in Potenza.
Y: Exactly! In the deep south of Italy…
Was the wedding in English?
V: No, in Italian, but a friend of mine translated everything for Yana.
Y: They were translating so many laws, but I didn’t really care. I just wanted to put my signature and “arrivederci, I want to celebrate with my husband”. I call our wedding an espresso wedding: very fast, but the more we stay together, the more interesting it gets.
Let’s start speaking about your music. Vincenzo, when did your passion for synthwave begin?
V: I’ve always been interested in 80s music, I didn’t even know what synthwave was, because when I started, in 2011, my music was not labeled as synthwave or outrun or any of the names that are used today. I grew up with my father’s tapes, so 80s music was in my blood. Only later I discovered there was a whole movement of this style.
I put my music on Soundcloud and so I discovered a lot of related artists. From that moment I started to enter this community of people, I connected with other artists and discovered a few labels. One of these labels, from America, contacted me on Soundcloud. That’s how I released my first EP, in August 2012 and that was the moment when my career as a synthwave music composer started officially.
When did you find out about Yana’s music?
V: It was only when we spoke for the first time. Then I started to appreciate her music. We even worked on a track together after a few months.
Y: We tried, but it’s very difficult for us to work together. First of all my experience wasn’t so much, but that wasn’t the main problem. I think we hear music in different ways, we have different directions and focus on different aspects. Later we also tried, a million times, to play together, but it’s impossible. I know he can play with everyone, but not me.
Did you study to be a musician?
Y: Music and I had bad karma, at the beginning. My mother had the idea that every girl had to prove herself with some kind of elevated knowledge, by learning to dance or
to play instruments. So she took me to a music school telling me that we would “just have a look around,” but it ended up with me attending for 7 years. I finished music school, but I still wasn’t able to hear music, even though I could read it. The headmaster told my mum that I had no talent and no future in music. I was fine with it and I didn’t really care about music, at the time. At that time I wasn’t able to understand the value of music studies; if someone asked me today to attend a music school, I would certainly run for it. Also now, I play music my way, but I do it and people like it. I would like
to meet the director of that school and tell him “look at me! I’m doing it, I compose music”. I hated every subject of music school. For me it was like going to hell. I never
connect that experience with what I do now.
V: My story is very funny: I started to study piano at 8/10 years of age, in a music school near the church of my town. I started the first lessons and when it was time to repeat the exercises at home… I didn’t have a piano. I should’ve thought to buy one before starting the lessons. I had this beautiful book with empty music sheets and I used it to draw a piano keyboard to exercise the chords, even though there was no
sound. I studied piano on paper. My teacher asked me if I had a piano, and when I said no, I answered that I was playing on paper. They forced me to buy something and so
I got my first keyboard, a 6-octave CASIO. During an exam, a teacher told me to put the music sheets on a piece of cardboard so that it wouldn’t fall during the test. I forgot
to do it and, obviously, the sheet fell during my exam and I was shocked about it. I kept on playing without reading music and understood I could feel it and had a good talent
for improvisation. The experience was such a shock that I stopped playing for a couple of months. From that point on, for the rest of my life, I self studied music.
Y: Every track you play is like learning, because it will always force you to study something new. Virtual instruments are like a big library of knowledge you will never
finish to learn. You will always have something new to discover.
V: When I was 14 years old, I started to self-study guitar and started to play in little bands. The experience was like an afternoon hobby for me. Then I started to make my concerts in squares and I really enjoyed the sensation that kind of life gives. I started playing with a bigger metal band and started touring around the south of Italy.
After a while I left the band because the kind of music we were playing didn’t excite me any longer, and I hated keeping my hair long. Then I jumped into electronic music, it was around 2005.
Have you always used virtual instruments?
V: No, I started with my keyboard, even though it wasn’t a synth. I connected that keyboard to my guitar effect pedals and I started to create some sounds and discovered how to record with virtual instruments, improving my technique
with time.
What about you, Yana?
Y: I’ve always used virtual instruments, but it wasn’t all planned. I didn’t want to compose Synthwave at the beginning. I was collaborating with a guy who was
composing some freestyle music for break-dance. Back then I had little experience with the programming world, and he introduced me to it. The programs that were used
back then were terrible and so difficult to interface with. But yes, I’ve always used virtual instruments, even though I asked Vincenzo to buy me that wonderful Yamaha DX7 you see over there, which is just an epic synthesiser. I’m not fond of real machines, because you must do concerts with them, but they are not very practical to be used at
home. Virtual instruments can do everything. Of course, being able to use analog instruments is a plus, but I really think they are useful just for concerts.
Vincenzo, you created a label, right?
V: Yes, in 2013, I met some friends which played the same style and
were under the same American label, because we were having some bad experiences with that label. We started to think that maybe we could create our own label, contact some other artists, create our own brand, because no one was doing anything like that at the time in Italy. And so we organised a concert in 2013, but our first compilation was released in 2014 under the title of Italo Disco Is Back. It was about the renaissance of Italo disco, renewed. Everyone forgets the importance of Italy, especially Italians, for this kind of music. Now we have a very large catalogue of artists, stretching from synthpop to outrun, to Italo disco, some chillwave and many other things.
Why don’t you have Powder Slut under your label?
Y: Because I don’t want to be under his label. Anyway, I don’t want people to think that I’m a musician just because I’m his wife. At the beginning, I was very angry about this, because I think that a lot of people thought that Vincenzo was helping me with my music. They used to think, “She’s a woman, so obviously he has to be helping her”.
The truth is that Vincenzo’s hands are never in my workspace. I ask for his opinion, but I never really care about the answer. I just ask to be polite. It’s a matter of principle: I
don’t want to be part of his label just because he’s my husband.
V: Also, her style is darker than the sound of my label. We have a different focus: more fresh and fun.
Y: Now, I’m going to ask different labels to find the right one for my music. If I am not able to find anything that is appropriate for my style, I will just self-produce myself.
What do you think about the importance that Italy has in your music style?
V: 50% of my tracks are considered to be Italo disco. I have the melodic influence that comes from the Italian tradition so, even if I wanted to hide my heritage, I would not be able to. You can immediately hear that I’m Italian, thanks to my powerful choruses.
Y: I’m very proud of residing in Italy because it’s a country that helped a lot for the development of this kind of music, horror soundtracks come to mind, Fabio Frizzi, he’s
my Italian god, he created really crazy soundtracks. He’s my greatest inspiration, but you need a lot of experience to be able to create something of that level. Now that
I live in Italy I feel very proud of people like Fabio Frizzi or Goblin, or even unknown composers who made really good soundtracks. I think Italian people should be prouder of their talent, and what they did during the 70s and the 80s. It was a wonderful moment. Italy was the beginning of so many things. Cinema, music, amazing cars like Ferrari and Lamborghini, lifestyles like paninari.
When did Italy stop being influential?
V: After the end of the 80s. In the 90s a decadence started, even though the first half was still quite interesting with Eurodance. But that wasn’t exported everywhere, while
Italo disco spread worldwide.
Y: Russia was crazy for Italo disco.
What are you up to at the moment?
V: At the moments I have parallel projects. Of course I continue my original project, but I also want to capture this moment in Italy, since the 80s influence seems to be back.
For this reason, I created a project with a friend, a very talented singer, and we are trying to recreate in a modern way music from the end of the 80s and the beginning of
the 90s. We sing in Italian, which is already something interesting because this kind of music is generally only in English. We’ll soon release our first video, and I hope
people will love it.

Are you also playing live?
V: Yes, I started my live shows for Vincenzo Salvia in January and I have already 6 more dates around Italy and in Europe. On the 2nd and 3rd February I will be in Firenze
and Vicenza. On March 9th I have a concert in Bologna. On the 15th March Berlin. 15th April Milano. 28th July London. Many other dates could be added.
When will we see Powder Slut on stage?
I already have 14 tracks for my new complete album. It’s a very thematic album and I hope to be able to play live shows after its release. I want to use my connections to propose my music and to start to go out. I want to create very visual shows with big
screens. I don’t care about people dancing, but you can just stay, drink and relax while listening to my music.
The last question, a very important one, is about your dog, G, who’s also known online as G Dog Composer.
V: She started to love 70s porn and horror music, when we watched Lucio Fulci’s movie, Paura della città dei morti viventi. She loved the soundtrack and decided to start her own project, as a horror musician, and so she released her first album of only 2 tracks, with Sunlover records.
So you don’t have your wife under your label but you have your dog?
V: Yes, it was a Halloween release. She was very successful and she’s now going to play with me on stage in Vicenza. At the end of the concert she will close my set with our
collaboration, playing the keyboards.

Synthspiria.fr: “Rencontre avec Vincenzo Salvia par Chaos Theory”

Cool write up on Synthspiria.fr and funny interview on Chaos Theory (you can listen to it here)

vincenzo-salvia-atari-bandcamp

Pur bien commencer la semaine, nouvel épisode de CTNetwork par Chaos Theory ! Cette semaine Pete Trautman et Chris Yukigami ont eu la chance de pouvoir recevoir l’artiste italien Vincenzo Salvia, qui était de passage à Paris, autour d’un verre et d’un micro.

Co-fondateur du label Sunlover Records, Vincenzo Salvia est un artiste phare du mouvement Synthwave et plus particulièrement de l’Italo Disco, genre qu’il chérit tant puisqu’ayant grandi en Italie avec les comédies italiennes comme par exemple Cinepanettoni, mettant en avant l’Italo Disco dans leur bande originale. Des influences qui l’ont suivies dans tout son parcours en tant que musicien, depuis plus de cinq ans maintenant.

Place maintenant au 19ème et premier épisode de l’année de CTNetwork avec Vicenzo Salvia et plein d’autres trucs, toujours en compagnie de nos chers Chris Yukigami, Pete Trautman,Nora, l’interprète ayant permis cet échange (et quelques autres invités), Vincenzo ne connaissant que très peu de mots en français et il s’en amuse sur son Facebook : «The only French words that I know are crêpes, profiteroles, tartellette citron, croissant, champagne and pâté».

My interview for Drive Radio. Not only pizza.

DriveRadio
Question N°1:
Can you please introduce yourself to those that may be new to your work?

I started to join the synthwave music in 2012 with my first EP Voyage. After this album my music had lots of evolutions, jumping from nostalgic ballads to some groovy Italo Disco tunes.

Question N°2: What are your musical influences? What kind of music do you listen when not producing?

I’m from Italy, so my main influence is the Italo Disco. This kind of music was always included in some funny italian comedies (Cinepanettoni) which I always loved and still love to watch. When I don’t produce my music I sometimes listen to some chillout not to focus on pizza.

italo-disco

Question N°3: What is your earworm at the moment? What have you listening to on repeat recently?

In this moment I’m listening to the Vacanze di Natale ’83 soundtrack, in loop. I’m already in the Christmas mood!


Question N°4: What inspires you while working on new Music? What inspired you for the work on your THE SUMMONER track?

60% of my music is focused on pizza. 20% on girls, 20% on Milfs. That’s all.
When I worked on my THE SUMMONER track I wanted something powerful for my scene. I searched for some 80s workout music style because it had to be fast and hot like a pizza in the wood oven.


Question N°5: What programs and instruments do you use for your Music? What is your favourite VST you use? And which Drum Machine do you prefer?

I work on Steinberg Nuendo as DAW with some plugins such as Arturia V Collection, Minimonsta, Zebra 2 and OP-X PRO II. The last two ones are definitely my favourite!

farina-di-qualita-preparazione-pizza-digeribile

Question N°6: What are your favourite Movie flicks and why?

My favourite ones are almost all the movies from Robin Williams. I loved him, he was always such a strong inspiration for me.
Another one is Rain Man, with Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise. I love everything in that movie, the story, the music (by Hans Zimmer), the interpretation from Dustin Hoffman was amazing.

rain-man-99656

Question N°7: What is the next step for you after the release of THE SUMMONER OST? A new Album? A new ep? Or other projects youre involved in?

I’m working on a new album feat. Pj D’Atri. He’s a crazy guitarist based in Austria. I also have a side project with an italian singer and we are focusing on some radio italo-pop tunes. Hope you’ll have the chance to listen to everything as soon as possible!

Original link here:
http://driveradio.be/2016/12/01/vincenzo-salvia-interview/

Review: Take a slice outta Vincenzo Salvia’s “Greatest Pizza”

Thanks to Arcavalon for this spicy review!

“You know when you hear that one record that you just hit play and dont even think about skipping to the next song? Well your in luck. We got one for ya.
Vincenzo Salvia’s Greatest Pizza
Vincenzo Salvia has be around for a while pumping out release after release with 17 releases total on Bandcamp. Greatest Pizza, his latest work brings that pure 80s sound and does it well.
It compiles a ton of his older work along with a previously unreleased track “Nightdrive with pizza”. If anyone was new to Salvia’s music this would be one great way to listen for the first time!
The stunning artwork for Greatest Pizza done by none other than Overglow, the Retrofuturistic 80’s inspired graphic artist whos work never fails to impress, and with tracks like “Suitcase in the Night” “Zombie Workout” and “voyage” plus the many other featured here, one could say “how can you not enjoy this amazing collection? Take a listen here!”

Another great review by my idol Giosuè Impellizzeri (Italian)

È un buon momento per il potentino Vincenzo Salvia, di diritto tra gli italiani che abbracciano con più criterio e consapevolezza gli stilemi della synthwave music. Ispirato dal recente scandalo che ha travolto la casa automobilistica di Wolfsburg, Salvia orchestra sapientemente melodie ed armonie evocate dalla synth music degli anni Ottanta, specialmente quella applicata in cinematografia (Moroder, Faltermeyer, Vangelis). La tavolozza dei suoni di “The Awakening Of The 1982 Golf GTD” profuma tanto di Kavinsky e il raddoppio ritmico, che squarcia la stesura in più parti, rinforza ulteriormente il gancio con le pellicole di un passato mai trascorso del tutto. Altrettanto evocativa è “Dieselgate” in cui si cela un retrogusto space-italo, per anni riportato in auge quasi esclusivamente da artisti localizzati tra Francia, Germania ed Olanda. Tocco più orchestrale e melanconico in “Passat Murder” col basso rotolante e struggenti linee melodiche che lo fanno assomigliare ad un Savage attualizzato per il pubblico del nuovo millennio. Mentre Volkswagen perde punti in borsa Salvia continua a far salire le proprie quotazioni in ambito musicale.

Original link here

Review on Wemusicmusic!

«The Volkswagen of Death». Abstrait et fort énigmatique, le titre du dernier EP du producteur italien Vincenzo Salvia épouse pourtant parfaitement les sonorités proposées par cet ambitieux projet.

Vincenzo Salvia - The Volkswagen of Death

Vincenzo Salvia s’est donné une mission : redonner à l’outrun ses lettres de noblesse. Alors que les dernières productions synthwave européennes commençaient doucement à se complaire dans l’excès de ringardise parodique, The Volkswagen of Death, vient remettre les pendules à l’heure.

Mixant avec brio sonorités qui fleurent bon les années 80 et la musique électronique de notre décennie, Vincenzo Salvia nous propose une course folle à bord d’un bolide, lancé à 300km/h, et qui se dirige droit vers l’espace.

Parce que c’est ça l’outrun : ressentir l’exacte sensation de piloter une Cadillac roulant sur une autoroute déserte du Nevada, alors que l’on n’a pas son permis et que l’on habite à Brive-la-Gaillarde.

Ecouter The Volkswagen of Death c’est s’accorder 12 belles minutes de plaisir. Trois titres à la fois sombres et lumineux, doux et violents : irrésistibles.

Pour soutenir le projet c’est ici.

Original link here