“Weekend” reviewed by Iron Skullet: 85 on 100!

While the weather is getting hotter and hotter, it seems people are enjoying more and more my latest album “Weekend”. Truly outrun inspired, it recently got an amazing review by the great Iron Skullet. Let’s read it together:

It’s been awhile since the world was blessed with a full album from Italian synthwave master Vincenzo Salvia, though there are more than enough melodic gems on Weekend to make it worth the wait. Long-time fans will notice immediately that the latest recording has a very different flavor from the excellent Auto Radio as well as EPs like Atlantis and Chromelove. This time around, Salvia’s songwriting style is brighter and more optimistic, and where previous efforts felt like an organic hybrid of vintage Italo disco and the modern sounds of synthwaveWeekend has taken a large step into more personal and unique territory. The result is a collection of hook-heavy pieces that combine classic synthpop and video game soundtracks with synthwave and a host of smaller elements, all peppered with Salvia’s highly detailed compositional style and wrapped up in an irresistibly lighthearted groove.

Weekend opens smoothly on the laid-back, sunny style of “Coastline Breakfast,” which feels like the musical equivalent of cool air on an early summer morning. Salvia’s elaborate and melodic creative approach is on display immediately as he layers one new element over the last, expertly building up through the extended intro until unveiling the track’s gorgeous primary melody. The continuous shifting of counter-melodies creates a nuanced and dynamic piece with several gratifying moments, and it showcases Salvia’s mastery over the elusive art of memorable songwriting. Deep, succinct bass tones anchor the composition while the numerous other components advance and withdraw for a captivating piece that stands up to repeated listens.

Vincenzo Salvia takes the tempo up a notch on the next entry, “Summertime Arcade,” an agile and quick creation that’s a clear homage to ‘80s-era video game soundtracks. The production only flirts with chiptune tones, instead leaving one foot in the realm of synthpop, though the ultra-quick melodies and punctuated backing rhythms bring to mind the quarter-munching goodness of arcade classics of yesteryear, all infused with Salvia’s signature compositional style.

A flurry of excellence occupies the midpoint of the album, as well, first with “Traffic Jam,” then with “Endless Roads, Pt. 1” and “Endless Roads, Pt. 2.” In an especially whimsical twist, Salvia works the light beep of a car horn into the patient and steady rhythm of “Traffic Jam,” and the result is an excellent example of the inspired and unapologetically optimistic tone of the recording.

Both “Endless Roads” tracks shine through with equal spirit. The first is one of the album’s most lively entries, and in terms of the songwriting style, perhaps the most reminiscent of 2014’s Auto Radio. The music opens quickly, diving into a bouncy, upbeat rhythm that is soon joined by Salvia’s chiptune-like melodies that flow across the music with easy grace. The song is once again a master class in writing engaging, memorable melodies, and the dynamic lines of the synth tones propel the composition through its running time with unwavering appeal.

“Endless Roads, Pt. 2” serves as the perfect counterpoint to the lively character of its first half, rolling in with a much more subdued personality on gentle bass notes and the slow groove of the melodies. Along with “White Lines, Red Sunset,” it’s the most low-key entry on the recording, lending balance to the tracklist and demonstrating Salvia’s versatility.

Not every song reaches the same level of seemingly effortless allure, however. “Rush Hour,” for example, feels like a great Vincenzo Salvia tune that’s been left out in the sun too long and its colors have begun to fade. “Vacanze All’italiana” has a similarly desaturated feel, and it’s somehow missing the polish and sheen of the album’s better entries. Weekend is also notably short, clocking in at just 29 minutes, which causes some of the less-than-memorable moments to seem more prominent and frequent than they actually are. However, the running length makes the album a perfect candidate for a vinyl or cassette release, which would match the spirit of the recording perfectly.

Despite the occasionally forgettable entry on the recording, Weekend never loses its charm and never encourages listeners to hasten on to the next track. And although the short running time is somewhat disappointing, it also ensures that the buoyant, highly melodic songwriting maintains its appeal throughout the entire running length. The album is just right as the soundtrack for an afternoon drive or a relaxing morning spent with a cup of coffee.

With his latest release, Vincenzo Salvia has reminded the world why he is one of synthwave’s most endearing and valuable creators. Weekend strengthens the artist’s already impressive discography with eight new creations capable of brightening up any day. The succinct song lengths and relatively brief tracklist make the album feel more like a light lunch than a full-course dinner, though the masterful melodies and infectious rhythms keep the recording’s momentum going strong just the same. For compelling and light-hearted synth music with a retro ‘80s heart, Weekend is a standout.


Rating: 85 / 100 (Great)

Songwriting: 9
Execution: 9
Production: 10
Song Variety: 8
Consistency: 7
Memorability: 8

(Original link here: https://ironskullet.com/2018/06/14/album-review-vincenzo-salvia-weekend/ )

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“Vaporwave Aesthetics” Sample Pack for Prime Loops

Somebody told Vaporwave is dead. Pffff… come on!
Vaporwave is healtier than ever.
I’ve just made a sample pack for Prime Loops: Vaporwave Aesthetics.
690MB+ of 80s inspired Vaporwave Samples featuring tons of synth & bass loops and their variations, plus a wide selection of Linn-style drum loops and one-shots!
Download it on Prime Loops website!

Car drift + synthwave music = best combo ever

Neros77 did it great again! His montages are always amazing, really. Here some Japanese car drifts from Initial-D with my track “Endless roads, pt. 1”, perfect fit!
I’d suggest you to subscribe to his YouTube channel if you didn’t yet, lots of wonderful synthwave music montages there!

“Endless roads, pt. 1” is a track from my album “Weekend”, available for digital download here:

VideoReview: “ForMyTape” reviewed Weekend!

I’ve understood an important thing of my life: I must learn French.
After the death of my hamster Jean Claude I stopped to speak it and I could catch only some words from this review… but he loved my album very much, this is sure!
Here the video review from “ForMyTape” Youtube channel!
THANK YOU DUDE!

If you want to grab my album “Weekend” there should be some remaining digital copies here [haha, funny…] on my Bandcamp:

Review: A sunny weekend with Vincenzo Salvia

Really sweet review from the French “DecibelBlog” of my new album “Weekend“!
The original review is in French, I poorly translated it in English, here it is!
(Original link here)

The last release of Vincenzo Salvia dates back to October 2017 with “The Pineapple Pizza Slayer” EP. The Italian producer and composer is back in April 2018 with a new album soberly entitled “Weekend“, a release that arrives just in time to accompany the return of the good weather! The cover designed by Vincenzo Salvia immediately sets the tone: between synthwave and outrun with a touch of italo disco, “Weekend” is an album that is fully appreciated on the roads or on a sunny weekend.
This “Weekend” has some great moments, starting with the beautiful “Coastline Breakfast” opening. Other notable titles are the groovy “Summertime Arcade” and its 16-bit sounds, the very nice “Traffic Jam” with the thrilling arrangements or the song “Endless Roads” (in 2 parts), also very successful. This album can be compared both for the musical style and for the cover of other previous Vincenzo Salvia releases such as “Voyage” in 2012 or “Auto Radio” in 2013.

tracklist
1 – Coastline Breakfast
2 – Summertime Arcade
3 – Vacanze All’Italiana
4 – Traffic Jam
5 – Endless Roads (Part 1)
6 – Endless Roads (Part 2)
7 – Rush Hour
8 – White Lines, Red Sunset

The album Weekend by Vincenzo Salvia is available in digital version on the Bandcamp  page of the artist since April 19, 2018. There is no physical output announced yet.

“Weekend” is here! I know, it’s thursday… I mean my album!

My latest album “Weekend” is finally out.
8 retro tracks for a Friday-Saturday-Sunday trip somewhere in time: 70s, 80s, funky, Italian movies, some 16 bit arcade mixed with a gentle fusion touch and Italo disco influences.

And surprises never come alone! 40% off on the full discography on Bandcamp for a limited period!

“Beyond the Gates” Motion Picture Soundtrack on vinyl!

If you’re a fan of “Beyond the Gates” horror movie’s soundtrack, this is the right moment to grab a vinyl copy!
My opening theme track “Outrun with the Dead” is included with the beautiful compositions by Wojciech Golczewski.
Nothing more to say, no more time to lose or you won’t find your copy!
BUY HERE

Pssss… “Outrun with the Dead” is also included in my B-Side digital album available on Bandcamp and all the main stores (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon…) so maybe you can show me some love! THANKS!

This is not the same blah blah blah interview.

I had this beautiful interview with Neon Order and there are lots of things which I never said before!

1. When and why did you start playing?
I started to play when I was still a child. My parents had a Phil Collins vinyl and I fell in love with “In the air tonight”, that drum fill of course, so I stole my mother’s wood spoons and played them on our straw chairs, until I broke them.

2. Which instruments do you play?
I can play guitars, piano, a little bit bass and drums. I’d love to improve with drums, I love them so much.

3. What was the first tune(s) you learned?
Well, “In the air tonight” on drums! I perfectly remember I learned Eric Clapton’s “Cocaine” on guitar as my first tune, but I can’t remember on piano.

4. Is your family musical?
Well, yes, it is.

5. Describe your family member’s musical interests and abilities.
My mother loves to sing and sometimes she goes with her musician friends to play in some pubs. They play acoustic jazz covers.
My brother plays electronic music, from trap to house, techno, nu disco. He’s really good with production.

6. Which famous musicians do you admire? Why?
I admire and love everything what belongs to my childhood: Phil Collins, Michael Jackson, Italo Disco, Tears for fears. They’re like a part of me.

7. Which famous musicians have you learned from?
I’ve learned a lot of from The Cure and Ludovico Einaudi. Strange to say them together ’cause they’re totally different, but they’re definitely my “teachers”.

8. Who was your first teacher? Other teachers?
I had a piano teacher on music school and she was a milf. Yeah.

9. Describe your first instrument. Other instruments.
Are the wood spoons an instrument? If not, my first one was a cute Casio keyboard (can’t remember the model, something similar to a Casio CT-680) where I learned to move my little fingers. I still have it in my mother’s flat.

10. What are your fondest musical memories? In your house? In your neighborhood or town?
Sure my first band where I played in my teenage. We played some Green Day, Oasis, Rem, Blur. It was my first experience to play with someone and it was just a hobby, we never performed live and never wanted, but it was a wonderful way to learn and spend time with company who shares a common passion.

11. Were you influenced by old records & tapes? Which ones?
Definitely all the tapes from my parents but especially all the 80s hits collection from my father. He had those compilations to listen to them in his car and I couldn’t wait to grow, to get my driving licence and driving by night!

12. Who are your favorite musicians? Groups? CD’s?
I don’t have my all-time favourite, just because I think music is the soundtrack of our life, so every moment must have its best music. 80s music is strong in my music background but I loved bands like Explosions in the sky, Dark Tranquillity, Death, The Cure and Ludovico Einaudi (in random order).

13. Have you been in competitions? Fleadh’s? Any prizes?
Yeah, I’ve been in a competition with my ex metal band. We played in a Transylvania Horror Rock Cafè in middle Italy (Civitanova Marche). I don’t remember very good, so probably we didn’t pass it haha!

14. Do you perform in public? Describe those occasions? Concerts, radio, TV?
I performed in different bands many times in public, most of all with metal bands, with my guitar. One of my favourite live was in Calabria, Southern Italy on a beach just few meters near sea. It was a metal festival, we were dressed in black with our face painted in white under the hot August sun. Woooh.

15. Do you play for dances? Step-dancers? Describe the differences.
I want my music be various. I love the Italo Disco and I have lots of songs inspired by that style, but I also made lots of tracks for workout, or “romantic moments”. Well, that’s a kind of dance too.

16. How do you handle mistakes during a performance?
I don’t make mistakes because my tracks have the same chords and melodies.
Ah, no, maybe 1 or 2 have different chords. But I never play them live.

17. Do you get nervous before a performance or a competition?
Yeah. And I love it.

18. What advice would you give to beginners who are nervous?
A glass of beer could help. If not, two glasses should. Ad libitum.

19. Do you attend sessions? What makes a good session?
Well, first is the music you play, second is how you communicate with your public, third is how you play.

20. How often and for how long do you practice?
I play almost every day for hours, maybe 4-5, depending on my other commitments, but I play only on keys. It’s sad I’m not that good anymore on guitars, there’s lot of rust on my fingers now, because I’m focusing especially on the electronic compositions.

21. What do you practice – exercises, new tunes, hard tunes, etc.?
The best thing for practice is to play on other artists’ tunes. No tabs, everything by ear and harder and harder. This is how I try to improve.

22. Do you teach music?
Yes, to my dog G. She’s a horror composer and she’s already good.

22. How do you balance your music with other obligations – mate, children, job?
Well, I can invert the question. Sometimes while I’m playing I can find some time for other obligations.